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Sunday 24th of September 2017



Pseudorabies - personal experiences


Pseudorabies experience by - Sanya
Southern Ontario, Canada

First symptons were light bubling frool that appeared suddenly and last for as little as 5 seconds. Sanya at first appeared very surprised at this ČnewČ behaviour which seemed to cause some ditrss for perhaps 5 - 10 seconds and should would immediately leave the area. Often she would then go to the food bowl and eat which seemed to make her feel better and more secure. Our cats drank fresh toilet water - they enjoyed it the most after we flushed the toilet and she good watch the water drain. We have well water which we use for own consumption. No toilet deoderizer or other chemicals wered except when cleaning. In such cases, lids were closed and would be flushed at leat 5 times before allowing toilet water for drinking. The cats do not loke the dish bowl water as it warmed too quickly. The next day, i noticed that she soent an unusual amount of time hiding. This was rare behavuir and occurred only when we have company iver and she wiould reappear within 2 minutes of guests leaving - she could even recognize an unfamiliar vehicle come up the driveway. At the end of the second day she was expressing some distree through her vocalization and it was sad, as though she was in pain. These episodes would last no more than 3 - 4 minutes and she would revert to her regular behaviour. She generally slep on my bed at my feet after spending at least an hour in my arms or draped over my tummy while I petted her, gave tummy massage which she adored, and about 10 - 15 minutes of brush grooming thta she also enjoed. Extremely affectionate and would cuddle with my on my soft blanket and go to sleep. Over the second night and into day 3, the episodes of salivation were turning to long ropes of drool and would last for up to about 5 minutes. At this point she began to manifest disorienting and bizarre behaviou and a growling sound. Sanya was always a very quiet cat and had the sweetest and flirtiest disposition and she would talk. She avoived the bright room and at first spent time hiding under the bed.In her two short years with us she showed nothing but sweet, playful behaviour, never hissed at any of other 3 cats and certainly never gfrowled. The other cats seemed to enjoy mothering her by grooming her a licking her face. she was a beatiful white short hair with clear blu eyes, exyremey even tempered and playful. Somthing was very wrong and we made an appointment to see the Vet later that evening. I had already thoroughly checked her, she didnčt seem to have a fever, was peeing and pooing normally and was also eating and drinking water normally. If anything, her appetite had increased and she would hide away more frequently. In fact she found her way under the sofa and managed to teast open the lining and actually crawl into the interior body of the sofa.
She would come when I called to her and wanted me to pet her and give her affection. I noticed that my voice and petting her during one of these drool attacks seemed to comfort her and she would stay calm if I had already been holding her. Then the drooling would suddenly start and she would try and run away back into her hiding spot.But my presence seemed to help and when the fit ended, she would revert to completely normal and her ususal behaviour. She would follow me around every where just to be with me. She was on the carpet when suddenly the drooling started. It was clear that she was very frighted and she vocalized her distress. All the other cats came to see what mught be brong with her and were acting with great concern. Her body became to spsm and I spoke sofly to calm her. But when I touched her, she bolted up the stair and appeared fearful and sounded like she wAS IN INTENSE PAIN. I kept calling to her which made her stop and we were able to place her in the crate where we would keeo her for observation. The Vet checked her on the 3rd day which was a Friday night. She was very shy, but we brought her in a large crate along with food, water and a small litter box. I felt that this would provide her with a secure space and allow me to keep an eye on her. It was my day off and so was the weekend. The Vet first checked to see if perhaps she may have swallowed a string and that ar piece might still be under her tongue to pull out - nothing. She pooed and it was normal consistence, no blood or mucous in her stool. Eyes were clear, no distcharge, gums nice normal pink, teeth good with only minot plaque.Lungfs were clear, no bloating, no sign of a hard stool or other foreign object blocking the bowel. The bladder appeared to be normal and was not distended. While being examined, she strted a drool episode and I was holding her down and stoking her to help keep her calm. she meowed very loudly about 3 times in great distress and started growland was trying to bolt back into her carry case. Now, her blood pressure elevited somewhat. Once it passed, she reverted back to normal behaviour and started grooming herslf. She is too young for hyperthyroidism or diabetes. The Vet advised that she gets worse we could perform an xray, take blood and stool sample and likely an ultrasuond and we could expect at least $1,200 - $1,500 and probably mor if a surgeury would likely be required. She had no sysmtons of vomitin, no blood in the stools, no nausea, throat or chest congention. No eye or nose dicharge, no fever, no chest bloating and no stomach bloating. Saturday night, we left her in her crate. i was awakaned my a most horrible and terrifyting noise. She was on her back having a terriffying seizure.The containrs of food, water and litter box had beenstroyed and she was covered in the bits food, litter and was wet. As i spoke to her softly she slowly came out if. We lifted her out and I wrapped her in a towrel I filled my two sinks with warm water and a gemple shampoo in one and washed her then rinsed her dirty bottom. She huddled in my arms for several minutes and seemed to return quiet and sad are the words that I use to describe her. We did not feel even any chance that somehow she could have a chance for recovery.On Sunday night, our son concluded very painfullythat he would take her back to the Vet and put her to sleep. On Monday morning, about 7;00 am, my husband oprnrd the door. She was running around carazily screeching, running into the furnure and into the walls. I was in the shower getting ready to go to work. When I entered my bedroom she had squeezed herself tightly and had wedged herself in a very narrow space betwwen the bed and night table and was convulsing again. We carefully lifted her and place her into her crate not wishing to see herself hurt even more. My husband was taking her now - we needed to end the suffering. Went I went downstairs to check up on our lttle baby, she had died. I have spent the time referncing the varioussymptons and am convinced that it is an only fir. We do not use any ratémouse poisonings. We set simple traps baited with either bacon, peanut butter or corn. In the past 2 months, we have found 2 mouse bodies that had been somewhat mauled but not eaten. I can find no other illness typyfying the symptons noted above, I was very disappointed that the Vet did not do additional research based on the clear and concise symptons that I supplied. Her suffering could have ended so much sooner and without the needless agony. It was horrible. I hope that someone takes the time
to reviewe my comments. Sanya was just past 2 yrs with all of her 1 yr vaccinations. All 3 other cats had been fully vaccinated around the same period. The are fully indoor cats only. The only outside they get is letting them out on the 2nd floor balcony for a bit of sun during spring, summer and fall. The winter snow is an occasional 1 minute novelty. I have found this experience very distressing.







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The information contained on this site is for the sole purpose of being informative and is not and should not be used or relied upon as medical advice.
Seek the advice of your vet or other qualified pet care provider before you decide on any treatment or for answers to any questions you may have regarding a feline medical symptom or medical condition.



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